1. We strive to be a place where there can be honest discussion, debate and fellowship. The rules are few so you can speak your mind. We know we are living in tough times and we hope to share answers and help with each other. Please join us.
    Dismiss Notice

Matthew 12:40

Discussion in 'General Talk' started by rstrats, Apr 21, 2014.

  1. rstrats

    rstrats

    Messages:
    27
    Gender:
    Male
    CoreIssue,

    re: "The question is irrelevant to the issues since a whole or portion of 3 days did occur."

    If you're referring to my question in post #19 then it is absolutely relevant. The question was in reply to your attempted analogy in post #18. The only way your example in post #18 could be analogous to the missing night of Matthew 12:40 is if it showed where a calendar day was counted as a calendar day when no part of the calendar day had occurred.
     
  2. CoreIssue

    CoreIssue Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,536
    Gender:
    Male
    What missing part of a day? Using which calendar, Hebrew or Roman?

    Late Friday the cross, one day. Saturday, two days and early Sunday three days.

    There is no requirement for a full 72 hours.
     
  3. rstrats

    rstrats

    Messages:
    27
    Gender:
    Male
    CoreIssue,

    re: "What missing part of a day?"

    In reference to what? I don't understand what you are asking.



    re: "Using which calendar, Hebrew or Roman?

    Let's say the Hebrew, but I don't see what difference it makes.




    re: "There is no requirement for a full 72 hours."

    Perhaps not, but there is a requirement that 3 night times be involved.
     
  4. CoreIssue

    CoreIssue Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,536
    Gender:
    Male
    First of all, we need to look at the context of the verse and the meaning of night as used.
    1. Now look at Jonah 1. There night is defined as:
    In both they were was compare to being in the pit, earth, etc.That is figurative usage.

    As well, in both definitions, 'night' has figurative meanings as well.

    Can your prove the definition you are using is the one used in both verses? No.

    Just like with Day of the Lord is not a 24 your day, but a thousand years.

    Unless you want to say the Bible is wrong, your usage of the word is wrong.

    As a wild throw out, Christ was dead on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. That is three days on the calendar and three nights in death.

    We simply do not know the meaning that was used. Nor do I see that God has to explain it to us.
     
  5. rstrats

    rstrats

    Messages:
    27
    Gender:
    Male
    With another new year, maybe someone new looking in will know of examples as requested in the OP and clarified in further posts. And again, remember that the purpose of this topic is not to discuss how long the Messiah was in the heart of the earth. As stated, there are other topics that do that. However, there are some who say that Matthew 12:40 is using common Jewish idiomatic language to try to explain the missing 3rd night, which would have to be the case with a 6th day of the week crucifixion/1st day of the week resurrection. But in order to legitimately say that it was employing common, idiomatic/figure of speech/colloquial language, one would have to know of other instances where a daytime or a night time was predicted to be involved with an event when no part of the daytime or no part of the night time could occur. I am simply looking for some of those instances, scriptural or otherwise.
     
  6. CoreIssue

    CoreIssue Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,536
    Gender:
    Male
    Already been discussed in detail.
     
  7. rstrats

    rstrats

    Messages:
    27
    Gender:
    Male
    CoreIssue,
    re: "Already been discussed in detail."

    But the discussion has been about issues not asked for in the OP or its clarification in subsequent posts. The core issue of this topic concerns the assertion by some that Matthew 12:40 is using common idiomatic/figure of speech/colloquial language. I am simply asking them for examples to support that assertion of commonality.
     
  8. CoreIssue

    CoreIssue Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,536
    Gender:
    Male
    The issue of how time was and is viewed was dealt with.

    You cannot produce any examples to the contrary.

    As long as how time was dealt with is understood your question is irrelevant.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2017
  9. rstrats

    rstrats

    Messages:
    27
    Gender:
    Male
    Since it's been awhile, someone new looking in may know of examples.
     

Share This Page